top of page

1967 Ferrari 330 GT 2+2 'Navarro' Drogo

Navarro's car is known by a series of names, including the "Golden Car," both for its paint and its side logo; the "Ferrari 330 GT 2+2 Speciale," perhaps the car's most generic name; and the "Navarro Special NART," for its later association with American Ferrari importer Luigi Chinetti. Though the body may differ radically from a stock 1966 Ferrari 330 GT 2+2, the two cars are virtually identical under the skin. Power comes from a 4.0-liter V-12, rated at 300 horsepower and mated to a five-speed manual transmission. The layout was a front-engine, rear-drive, and a live axle was used in the rear instead of a fully independent suspension. Disc brakes were fitted to all four corners, ensuring that 330 models could scrub off speed as quickly as they could generate it.


The body of the 1966 Ferrari 330 GT Navarro Special has generated more than a bit of controversy over the years, with some questioning why Piero Drogo's shop, Carrozzeria Sports Cars, would even undertake such a project. Drogo died in a 1973 car accident, so his ultimate motivation is lost to history, but it likely comes down to this: As a small coachbuilder, it's never wise to turn away business. Drogo's firm had experience creating new bodies for other Ferrari models, the most renowned of which is likely the 1962 Ferrari 250 GT "Breadvan," designed by Bizzarini but built by Drogo.